In case anyone is wondering how I’m getting on in Honduras…

I’m laying on my bunk bed, listening to the rain outside the open screened windows and wondering what I’ll have to cook myself for dinner, if the electricity doesn’t go out again. Out the front door is a small gravel/dirt road, scattered with ditches and house poo. Small cement houses line the street, some are colorful but all have gates and barbed wires over the property. Chickens run free, as well as stray cats an dogs. Beyond the balcony of the volunteer house is the beach of El Porvenir-a shabby looking beach with lots of abandoned shoes and random fishermen in colorful row boats. I dipped my feet in the Caribbean Sea for the first time earlier. I got a Wifi stick, but it’s pretty unreliable. Time doesn’t exist here. Restaurants open sometime in the afternoons, people make plans but never name a time, buses are infrequent and there is just a lot of free time, more free time then I know what to do with.
I had expected my surroundings to be like this more or less, but I wasn’t ready for all this time of NOTHING-ness. The three other volunteers are perfectly at peace and content with the way things are cause they’ve been here longer than me and assure me that I’ll adjust. But I’ve NEVER been the type of person to sit still for too long (anyone who knows me at all can vouch for that). They just read a lot of books, lay around drinking tea (no one in the house drinks coffee! What?!) and go online from what I’ve observed. I feel bad for bothering them all the time, asking them what they’re doing, what they’ll do later, what they normal do…but the answers don’t reassure me. Laundry. Sit. Cook. They are lovely people though! I just need to find ways to entertain myself, or embrace the boredom. I can promise for a fact that I will be blogging on here a lot more. Living here is like living in Yilan, if I was still in Taiwan. The most exciting thing I’ve done since my arrival was go to the supermarket with roommates to the nearest city-La Ceiba. They go weekly to buy groceries, but since I haven’t had to cook in…ever, I had no clue what to buy. I bought bananas. I wanted to stay longer cause the town at least had market stands, some stores and cafes, but my Spanish is not good enough to get around with yet. And unlike Taiwan, not everyone here is willing to help out foreigners without a hidden agenda. I will adapt and I WILL enjoy my time here, but right now I’m not starting off as well as I thought I would. I think I thought I would be busy getting bustled into Honduran family’s homes to join them for dinner and celebrations, chatting with locals at cafes, begged to hike and travel around the country with new friends and of course, working with chatty Honduran kids…but that hasn’t quite happened yet. YET!
Anyways, that’s about it for now. Chin up! I cannot wait for classes to start tomorrow!

Okay one little habit I haven’t left behind in Taipei…check out my lunch!! Fried chicken here is phenomenal-I’ve got nothing bad to say about the food!

Kalong

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